Women, Angry Over Food Prices, Act Up


Food prices in the United States shot up in 1917 as a consequence of World War I, then engulfing Europe.  Agriculture had come to a halt in the theater of war, so the US had stepped up its production and export of food in response.  Our nation was shipping vast quantities of food overseas (wheat especially), both in support of the Allied war effort and to relieve famished civilian populations.  Besides leading to a collossal loss of life, the all-consuming war had disrupted everyday life in many countries, reducing many people to homelessness, hunger, and worse.

Back in the States, the price of food was skyrocketing.  Food was scarce, and ordinary wage-earners couldn’t afford enough food to feed their families.  Frustrated women, many of them immigrants, began protesting in places like Newark and New York City.   The crowd of women above “charged” New York city hall in the winter of 1917 to plead for bread.

Similarly, women in Newark slogged en masse through the snow and slush to present their mayor with a petition for food relief.  Many of the women brought their children to the demonstration.  The spectacle of the protestors, appearing in numbers with their hungry children, made the urgency of their hunger tough to ignore.  Only people with a just case would stand so patiently in bad weather, the snow falling on their umbrellas, hoping for compassion and mercy to come down, too.

Image: from this source, and this.

 

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